Team:

Jonas Auda

Academic Staff

Jonas Auda, M.Sc.

Room:
SM 203
Phone:
+49 201183 - 2982
Email:
Consultation Hour:
by appointment
Address:
Universität Duisburg-Essen
Institut für Informatik und Wirtschaftsinformatik (ICB)
Mensch-Computer Interaktion
Schützenbahn 70
45127 Essen

Bio:

Jonas is a research assistant at the Human-Computer Interaction Group of the University Duisburg-Essen. He received his Master degree in Computer Science from the University of Stuttgart. Further, he was working as a student assistant at the hciLab in Stuttgart and did an internship at the Tampere University of Technology in Finland. Jonas received first insights into industrial software engineering as a student trainee. His current research areas cover Interactions with Virtual and Augmented  Realities, Brain-Computer-Interfaces (BCIs) and Ubiquitous Computers.

Fields of Research:

Jonas Auda on Google Scholar and ResearchGate

Publications:

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  • Faltaous, Sarah; Prochazka, Marvin; Auda, Jonas; Keppel, Jonas; Wittig, Nick; Gruenefeld, Uwe; Schneegass, Stefan: Give Weight to VR: Manipulating Users’ Perception of Weight in Virtual Reality with Electric Muscle Stimulation, Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA 2022. (ISBN 9781450396905) doi:10.1145/3543758.3547571) CitationDetails

    Virtual Reality (VR) devices empower users to experience virtual worlds through rich visual and auditory sensations. However, believable haptic feedback that communicates the physical properties of virtual objects, such as their weight, is still unsolved in VR. The current trend towards hand tracking-based interactions, neglecting the typical controllers, further amplifies this problem. Hence, in this work, we investigate the combination of passive haptics and electric muscle stimulation to manipulate users’ perception of weight, and thus, simulate objects with different weights. In a laboratory user study, we investigate four differing electrode placements, stimulating different muscles, to determine which muscle results in the most potent perception of weight with the highest comfort. We found that actuating the biceps brachii or the triceps brachii muscles increased the weight perception of the users. Our findings lay the foundation for future investigations on weight perception in VR.

  • Gruenefeld, Uwe; Auda, Jonas; Mathis, Florian; Schneegass, Stefan; Khamis, Mohamed; Gugenheimer, Jan; Mayer, Sven: VRception: Rapid Prototyping of Cross-Reality Systems in Virtual Reality. In: Proceedings of the 41st ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI). Association for Computing Machinery, New Orleans, United States 2022. doi:10.1145/3491102.3501821CitationDetails

    Cross-reality systems empower users to transition along the realityvirtuality continuum or collaborate with others experiencing different manifestations of it. However, prototyping these systems is challenging, as it requires sophisticated technical skills, time, and often expensive hardware. We present VRception, a concept and toolkit for quick and easy prototyping of cross-reality systems. By simulating all levels of the reality-virtuality continuum entirely in Virtual Reality, our concept overcomes the asynchronicity of realities, eliminating technical obstacles. Our VRception Toolkit leverages this concept to allow rapid prototyping of cross-reality systems and easy remixing of elements from all continuum levels. We replicated six cross-reality papers using our toolkit and presented them to their authors. Interviews with them revealed that our toolkit sufficiently replicates their core functionalities and allows quick iterations. Additionally, remote participants used our toolkit in pairs to collaboratively implement prototypes in about eight minutes that they would have otherwise expected to take days.

  • Auda, Jonas; Grünefeld, Uwe; Schneegass, Stefan: If The Map Fits! Exploring Minimaps as Distractors from Non-Euclidean Spaces in Virtual Reality. In: CHI 22. ACM, 2022. doi:10.1145/3491101.3519621CitationDetails
  • Auda, Jonas; Grünefeld, Uwe; Kosch, Thomas; Schneegass, Stefan: The Butterfly Effect: Novel Opportunities for Steady-State Visually-Evoked Potential Stimuli in Virtual Reality. In: Researchgate (Ed.): Augmented Humans. Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan 2022. doi:DOI:10.1145/3519391.3519397CitationDetails
  • Auda, Jonas; Mayer, Sven; Verheyen, Nils; Schneegass, Stefan: Flyables: Haptic Input Devices for Virtual Reality using Quadcopters. In: ResearchGate (Ed.): VRST. 2021. doi:10.1145/3489849.3489855CitationDetails
  • Auda, Jonas; Grünefeld, Uwe; Pfeuffer, Ken; Rivu, Radiah; Florian, Alt; Schneegass, Stefan: I'm in Control! Transferring Object Ownership Between Remote Users with Haptic Props in Virtual Reality. In: Proceedings of the 9th ACM Symposium on Spatial User Interaction (SUI). Association for Computing Machinery, 2021. doi:10.1145/3485279.3485287CitationDetails
  • Auda, Jonas; Grünefeld, Uwe; Schneegass, Stefan: Enabling Reusable Haptic Props for Virtual Reality by Hand Displacement. In: Proceedings of the Conference on Mensch Und Computer (MuC). Association for Computing Machinery, Ingolstadt, Germany 2021, p. 412-417. doi:10.1145/3473856.3474000CitationDetails

    Virtual Reality (VR) enables compelling visual experiences. However, providing haptic feedback is still challenging. Previous work suggests utilizing haptic props to overcome such limitations and presents evidence that props could function as a single haptic proxy for several virtual objects. In this work, we displace users’ hands to account for virtual objects that are smaller or larger. Hence, the used haptic prop can represent several differently-sized virtual objects. We conducted a user study (N = 12) and presented our participants with two tasks during which we continuously handed them the same haptic prop but they saw in VR differently-sized virtual objects. In the first task, we used a linear hand displacement and increased the size of the virtual object to understand when participants perceive a mismatch. In the second task, we compare the linear displacement to logarithmic and exponential displacements. We found that participants, on average, do not perceive the size mismatch for virtual objects up to 50% larger than the physical prop. However, we did not find any differences between the explored different displacement. We conclude our work with future research directions.

  • Auda, Jonas; Weigel, Martin; Cauchard, Jessica; Schneegass, Stefan: Understanding Drone Landing on the Human Body. In: ResearchGate (Ed.): 23rd International Conference on Mobile Human-Computer Interaction. 2021. doi:10.1145/3447526.3472031CitationDetails
  • Auda, Jonas; Heger, Roman; Gruenefeld, Uwe; Schneegaß, Stefan: VRSketch: Investigating 2D Sketching in Virtual Reality with Different Levels of Hand and Pen Transparency. In: 18th International Conference on Human–Computer Interaction (INTERACT). Springer, Bari, Italy 2021, p. 195-211. doi:10.1007/978-3-030-85607-6_14CitationDetails

    Sketching is a vital step in design processes. While analog sketching on pen and paper is the defacto standard, Virtual Reality (VR) seems promising for improving the sketching experience. It provides myriads of new opportunities to express creative ideas. In contrast to reality, possible drawbacks of pen and paper drawing can be tackled by altering the virtual environment. In this work, we investigate how hand and pen transparency impacts users’ 2D sketching abilities. We conducted a lab study (N=20N=20) investigating different combinations of hand and pen transparency. Our results show that a more transparent pen helps one sketch more quickly, while a transparent hand slows down. Further, we found that transparency improves sketching accuracy while drawing in the direction that is occupied by the user’s hand.

  • Liebers, Jonathan; Abdelaziz, Mark; Mecke, Lukas; Saad, Alia; Auda, Jonas; Alt, Florian; Schneegaß, Stefan: Understanding User Identification in Virtual Reality Through Behavioral Biometrics and the Effect of Body Normalization. In: Proceedings of the 40th ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI). Association for Computing Machinery, Yokohama, Japan 2021. doi:10.1145/3411764.3445528CitationDetails

    Virtual Reality (VR) is becoming increasingly popular both in the entertainment and professional domains. Behavioral biometrics have recently been investigated as a means to continuously and implicitly identify users in VR. Applications in VR can specifically benefit from this, for example, to adapt virtual environments and user interfaces as well as to authenticate users. In this work, we conduct a lab study (N = 16) to explore how accurately users can be identified during two task-driven scenarios based on their spatial movement. We show that an identification accuracy of up to 90% is possible across sessions recorded on different days. Moreover, we investigate the role of users’ physiology in behavioral biometrics by virtually altering and normalizing their body proportions. We find that body normalization in general increases the identification rate, in some cases by up to 38%; hence, it improves the performance of identification systems.

  • Borsum, Florian; Pascher, Max; Auda, Jonas; Schneegass, Stefan; Lux, Gregor; Gerken, Jens: Stay on Course in VR: Comparing the Precision of Movement between Gamepad, Armswinger, and Treadmill: Kurs Halten in VR: Vergleich Der Bewegungspräzision von Gamepad, Armswinger Und Laufstall. In: Mensch Und Computer 2021. Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA 2021, p. 354-365. doi:10.1145/3473856.3473880CitationDetails

    In diesem Beitrag wird untersucht, inwieweit verschiedene Formen von Fortbewegungstechniken in Virtual Reality Umgebungen Einfluss auf die Pr\"{a}zision bei der Interaktion haben. Dabei wurden insgesamt drei Techniken untersucht: Zwei der Techniken integrieren dabei eine k\"{o}rperliche Aktivit\"{a}t, um einen hohen Grad an Realismus in der Bewegung zu erzeugen (Armswinger, Laufstall). Als dritte Technik wurde ein Gamepad als Baseline herangezogen. In einer Studie mit 18 Proband:innen wurde die Pr\"{a}zision dieser drei Fortbewegungstechniken \"{u}ber sechs unterschiedliche Hindernisse in einem VR-Parcours untersucht. Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass f\"{u}r einzelne Hindernisse, die zum einen eine Kombination aus Vorw\"{a}rts- und Seitw\"{a}rtsbewegung erfordern (Slalom, Klippe) sowie auf Geschwindigkeit abzielen (Schiene), der Laufstall eine signifikant pr\"{a}zisere Steuerung erm\"{o}glicht als der Armswinger. Auf den gesamten Parcours gesehen ist jedoch kein Eingabeger\"{a}t signifikant pr\"{a}ziser als ein anderes. Die Benutzung des Laufstalls ben\"{o}tigt zudem signifikant mehr Zeit als Gamepad und Armswinger. Ebenso zeigte sich, dass das Ziel, eine reale Laufbewegung 1:1 abzubilden, auch mit einem Laufstall nach wie vor nicht erreicht wird, die Bewegung aber dennoch als intuitiv und immersiv wahrgenommen wird.

  • Borsum, Florian; Pascher, Max; Auda, Jonas; Schneegass, Stefan; Lux, Gregor; Gerken, Jens: Stay on Course in VR: Comparing the Precision of Movement between Gamepad, Armswinger, and Treadmill: Kurs Halten in VR: Vergleich Der Bewegungspräzision von Gamepad, Armswinger Und Laufstall, Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA 2021. (ISBN 9781450386456) doi:10.1145/3473856.3473880) CitationDetails

    In diesem Beitrag wird untersucht, inwieweit verschiedene Formen von Fortbewegungstechniken in Virtual Reality Umgebungen Einfluss auf die Pr\"\\\{a}zision bei der Interaktion haben. Dabei wurden insgesamt drei Techniken untersucht: Zwei der Techniken integrieren dabei eine k\"\\\{o}rperliche Aktivit\"\\\{a}t, um einen hohen Grad an Realismus in der Bewegung zu erzeugen (Armswinger, Laufstall). Als dritte Technik wurde ein Gamepad als Baseline herangezogen. In einer Studie mit 18 Proband:innen wurde die Pr\"\\\{a}zision dieser drei Fortbewegungstechniken \"\\\{u}ber sechs unterschiedliche Hindernisse in einem VR-Parcours untersucht. Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass f\"\\\{u}r einzelne Hindernisse, die zum einen eine Kombination aus Vorw\"\\\{a}rts- und Seitw\"\\\{a}rtsbewegung erfordern (Slalom, Klippe) sowie auf Geschwindigkeit abzielen (Schiene), der Laufstall eine signifikant pr\"\\\{a}zisere Steuerung erm\"\\\{o}glicht als der Armswinger. Auf den gesamten Parcours gesehen ist jedoch kein Eingabeger\"\\\{a}t signifikant pr\"\\\{a}ziser als ein anderes. Die Benutzung des Laufstalls ben\"\\\{o}tigt zudem signifikant mehr Zeit als Gamepad und Armswinger. Ebenso zeigte sich, dass das Ziel, eine reale Laufbewegung 1:1 abzubilden, auch mit einem Laufstall nach wie vor nicht erreicht wird, die Bewegung aber dennoch als intuitiv und immersiv wahrgenommen wird.

  • Auda, Jonas; Gruenefeld, Uwe; Mayer, Sven: It Takes Two To Tango: Conflicts Between Users on the Reality-Virtuality Continuum and Their Bystanders. In: Proceedings of the 14th ACM Interactive Surfaces and Spaces (ISS). Association for Computing Machinery, Lisbon, Portugal 2020. CitationDetails

    Over the last years, Augmented and Virtual Reality technology became more immersive. However, when users immerse themselves in these digital realities, they detach from their real-world environments. This detachment creates conflicts that are problematic in public spaces such as planes but also private settings. Consequently, on the one hand, the detaching from the world creates an immerse experience for the user, and on the other hand, this creates a social conflict with bystanders. With this work, we highlight and categorize social conflicts caused by using immersive digital realities. We first present different social settings in which social conflicts arise and then provide an overview of investigated scenarios. Finally, we present research opportunities that help to address social conflicts between immersed users and bystanders.

  • Schneegaß, Stefan; Auda, Jonas; Heger, Roman; Grünefeld, Uwe; Kosch, Thomas: EasyEG: A 3D-printable Brain-Computer Interface. In: Proceedings of the 33rd ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology (UIST). Minnesota, USA 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1145/3379350.3416189CitationDetails

    Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) are progressively adopted by the consumer market, making them available for a variety of use-cases. However, off-the-shelf BCIs are limited in their adjustments towards individual head shapes, evaluation of scalp-electrode contact, and extension through additional sensors. This work presents EasyEG, a BCI headset that is adaptable to individual head shapes and offers adjustable electrode-scalp contact to improve measuring quality. EasyEG consists of 3D-printed and low-cost components that can be extended by additional sensing hardware, hence expanding the application domain of current BCIs. We conclude with use-cases that demonstrate the potentials of our EasyEG headset.

  • Poguntke, Romina; Schneegass, Christina; van der Vekens, Lucas; Rzayev, Rufat; Auda, Jonas; Schneegass, Stefan; Schmidt:, Albrecht: NotiModes: an investigation of notification delay modes and their effects on smartphone usersy. In: MuC '20: Proceedings of the Conference on Mensch und Computer. ACM, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.1145/3404983.3410006CitationDetails
  • Agarwal, Shivam; Auda, Jonas; Schneegaß, Stefan; Beck:, Fabian: A Design and Application Space for Visualizing User Sessions of Virtual and Mixed Reality Environments. In: VMV2020. ACM, 2020. doi:10.2312/vmv.20201194CitationDetails
  • Poguntke, Romina; Schneegass, Christina; van der Vekens, Lucas; Rzayev, Rufat; Auda, Jonas; Schneegass, Stefan; Schmidt, Albrecht: NotiModes: an investigation of notification delay modes and their effects on smartphone users. In: MuC '20: Proceedings of the Conference on Mensch und Computer. ACM, Magdebug, Germany 2020. doi:10.1145/3404983.3410006CitationDetails
  • Pfeiffer, Max; Medrano, Samuel Navas; Auda, Jonas; Schneegass, Stefan: STOP! Enhancing Drone Gesture Interaction with Force Feedback. In: CHI'19 Proceedings. HAL, Glasgow, UK 2019. doi:https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-02128395/documentPDFFull textCitationDetails
    STOP! Enhancing Drone Gesture Interaction with Force Feedback
  • Jonas Auda, Max Pascher; Schneegass, Stefan: Around the (Virtual) World - Infinite Walking in Virtual Reality Using Electrical Muscle Stimulation. In: Acm (Ed.): CHI'19 Proceedings. Glasgow 2019. doi:https://doi.org/10.1145/3290605.3300661PDFCitationDetails
    Around the (Virtual) World

    Virtual worlds are infinite environments in which the user can move around freely. When shifting from controller-based movement to regular walking as an input, the limitation of the real world also limits the virtual world. Tackling this challenge, we propose the use of electrical muscle stimulation to limit the necessary real-world space to create an unlimited walking experience. We thereby actuate the users‘ legs in a way that they deviate from their straight route and thus, walk in circles in the real world while still walking straight in the virtual world. We report on a study comparing this approach to vision shift – the state-of-the-art approach – as well as combining both approaches. The results show that particularly combining both approaches yield high potential to create an infinite walking experience.

  • Antoun, Sara; Auda, Jonas; Schneegass, Stefan: SlidAR - Towards using AR in Education. In: MUM 2018: Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Multimedia. ACM, Cairo, Egypt 2018. doi:https://doi.org/10.1145/3282894.3289744PDFCitationDetails
    SlidAR
  • Auda, Jonas; Hoppe, Matthias; Amiraslanov, Orkhan; Zhou, Bo; Knierim, Pascal; Schneegass, Stefan; Schmidt, Albrecht; Lukowicz, Paul: LYRA - smart wearable in-flight service assistant. In: ISWC '18: Proceedings of the 2018 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers. ACM, Singapore, Singapore 2018. doi:https://doi.org/10.1145/3267242.3267282PDFCitationDetails
    LYRA
  • Weber, Dominik; Voit, Alexandra; Auda, Jonas; Schneegass, Stefan; Henze, Niels: Snooze! - investigating the user-defined deferral of mobile notifications. In: MobileHCI '18: Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services. ACM, Barcelona, Spain 2018. doi:https://doi.org/10.1145/3229434.3229436PDFCitationDetails
    Snooze!
  • Auda, Jonas; Schneegass, Stefan; Faltaous, Sarah: Control, Intervention, or Autonomy? Understanding the Future of SmartHome Interaction. In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI). ACM, Montreal, Canada 2018. PDFCitationDetails
    Control, Intervention, or Autonomy? Understanding the Future of SmartHome Interaction
  • Auda, Jonas; Weber, Dominik; Voit, Alexandra; Schneegass, Stefan: Understanding User Preferences towards Rule-based Notification Deferral. In: CHI EA '18: Extended Abstracts of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM, Montreal, Canada 2018. doi:https://doi.org/10.1145/3170427.3188688PDFCitationDetails
    Understanding User Preferences towards Rule-based Notification Deferral
  • Alt, Florian; Schneegass, Stefan; Auda, Jonas; Rzayev, Rufat; Broy, Nora: Using eye-tracking to support interaction with layered 3D interfaces on stereoscopic displays. In: IUI '14: Proceedings of the 19th international conference on Intelligent User Interfaces. ACM, Haifa, Israel 2014. doi:https://doi.org/10.1145/2557500.2557518PDFCitationDetails
    Using eye-tracking to support interaction with layered 3D interfaces on stereoscopic displays